More Information About Employment Discrimination
Report Discrimination Immediately To Preserve your Claim

Reporting Requirements And
Number of Employees Company Must Have to Report Discrimination
Two women gossiping

REPORTING REQUIREMENTS: If your employer has a policy for reporting discrimination, you are required by the law to report the offending conduct to the employer's representative responsibile for receiving complaints. It is a good practice to report the discrimination to the human resources office.

Report the Conduct Even If There Is No Policy: Regardless of whether a policy exists or not, it is the best course of action to report the offending behavior to your supervisor, and the human resource office. This prevents the employer from later taking the position that you do not have a claim because you did not report the offending conduct. The report should be made verbally at once, and then followed-up by a written report. The written report should be sent certified mail with a return-reciept requested to the supervisor you made your complaint to, as well as the human resources office.

THINGS TO DO TO HELP YOUR CLAIMS:
    1) Keep a diary of all events that occur;
    2) Do not keep your diary at work;
    3) See a Physician, if you feel you are being effected emotionally or mentally;
    4) Be the "model" employee. Do not give your employer a reason to terminate your employment.

REMEMBER: The employer needs to only state a legitimate business reason for its conduct against you. If you come to work late, perform your job below the level required or otherwise become a less productive employee, you will be giving your employer reason to terminate you.

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES THE EMPLOYER MUST HAVE IN ORDER FOR YOU TO FILE A CHARGE
AND THE DEADLINE TO FILE BY TYPE OF DISCRIMINATION:

Age Discrimination:
Your employer must have 20 or more employees. You have 180 days to file a charge of discrimination. (This may be extened by state laws). If you are a federal employee, you have 45 days to contact an EEO Counselor.

Sex Discrimination (including pregnancy):
Your employer must have 15 or more employees. You have 180 days to file a charge of discrimination. (This may be extened by state laws). If you are a federal employee, you have 45 days to contact an EEO Counselor.

Race/Color Discrimination:
Your employer must have 15 or more employees. You have 180 days to file a charge of discrimination. (This may be extened by state laws). If you are a federal employee, you have 45 days to contact an EEO Counselor.

Religious Discrimination:
Your employer must have 15 or more employees. You have 180 days to file a charge of discrimination. (This may be extened by state laws). If you are a federal employee, you have 45 days to contact an EEO Counselor.

National Origin Discrimination:
Your employer must have 15 or more employees. You have 180 days to file a charge of discrimination. (This may be extened by state laws). If you are a federal employee, you have 45 days to contact an EEO Counselor.

Disability Discrimination:
Your employer must have 15 or more employees. You have 180 days to file a charge of discrimination. (This may be extened by state laws). If you are a federal employee, you have 45 days to contact an EEO Counselor.

Genetic Information Discrimination:
Your employer must have 15 or more employees. You have 180 days to file a charge of discrimination. (This may be extened by state laws). If you are a federal employee, you have 45 days to contact an EEO Counselor.

Sexual Harassment Discrimination:
Your employer must have 15 or more employees. You have 180 days to file a charge of discrimination. (This may be extened by state laws). If you are a federal employee, you have 45 days to contact an EEO Counselor.

Equal Pay Compensation Discrimination:
Under the Equal Pay Act, virtually all employers. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act and Title VII employers must have 15 or more employees. Under the Age discrimination in Employment Act, the employer must have 20 or more employees. Under the Equal Pay Act, you have two years to go directly to court or to the EEOC. Under Title VII, the ADA or the ADEA, you have 180 days to file a charge of discrimiantion. (The time to file may be extended by state laws). If you are a federal employee you have 45 days to contact an EEO Counselor.

Retaliation:
Your employer must have 15 or more employees claims under Title VI or the Americans with Disabilities Act. If your claim arises out of the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, your employer must have 20 or more employees. Under the Equal Pay Act, virtually all employers. Under Title VII, the ADA, the ADEA or the EPA, you have 180 days to file a charge of discrimination. (The time to file may be extended by state laws). If you are a federal employee, you have 4 days to contact an EEO Counselor.


    If you would like to discuss your discrimination case with a dedicated, caring, thorough, and aggressive attorney you             can trust, call 904-619-9281 or e-mail me now.



If you would like to learn more about the proceedure to file a charge of discrimination, click here.

If you are Outside the State of Florida: For those of you who live in other states, there may be a state agency in your state. It is highly recommended that you investigate to determine which agency should be contacted to file a charge of discrimination in your home state. You should seek legal advise from a licensed attorney in your state. You can usually locate a licensed attorney in your state by contacting the state bar association or by visiting the National Employment Lawyers Association's "Find-A-Lawyer Directory.


Discrimination can take its toll on your productivity.
If you feel you were the victim of discrimination or retaliatory conduct, you should file a charge of discrimination immediately to preserve your rights from statutory deadlines.